"Years" by Bartholomäus Traubeck

A record player that plays slices of wood. Year ring data is translated into music, 2011.
Modified turntable, computer, vvvv, camera, acrylic glass, veneer, approx. 90x50x50 cm.

Artist’s statement: A tree’s year rings are analysed for their strength, thickness and rate of growth. This data serves as basis for a generative process that outputs piano music. It is mapped to a scale which is again defined by the overall appearance of the wood (ranging from dark to light and from strong texture to light texture). The foundation for the music is certainly found in the defined ruleset of programming and hardware setup, but the data acquired from every tree interprets this ruleset very differently.

Bartholomäus was born in Munich, Germany in 1987. Currently he lives and works in Linz, Austria.

— 1 year ago
#art  #conceptual art  #records  #vinyl  #trees  #nature  #science  #technology  #plants  #sound 
Powerful Lasers Could Be Fired Into the Clouds to Make It Rain

“We’re further along in using science to manually force the weather’s hand than many people suspect. In 2009, for example, the Chinese government used weather manipulation to bring a snowstorm to Beijing, and they aren’t the only nation giving it a try. But using so-called “cloud seeding” techniques as high-tech rain dances is controversial; critics say it’s both ineffective and bad for the environment. A potentially better solution — to this, as to most things! — is to fire up some lasers.

Last year, a paper published in Nature Communications showed it was possible to form water particles using lasers. That’s not the same as creating rain; the particles were about 100 times too small to be rain drops. But it’s somewhat of a proof of concept, and as a recent paper in the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics points out, our lasers are only getting better.”

(via Popular Science)

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#science  #technology  #weather  #meteorology 

Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee: Larry Eats A Pancake

Jerry’s special guest is Larry David in the premiere episode of Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee. Next episode starting August 2nd @ 9pm ET/6pm PT.

Watch Comedians in Cars getting Coffee and hundreds of other free full-length streaming TV shows and movies on http://www.crackle.com

To watch this in full-screen HD, click here.

— 1 year ago with 2 notes
#comedy  #seinfeld  #curb your enthusiasm  #larry david  #cars  #beatle  #VW 
s-nn-mero:


On the morning of 16 October 1968, U.S. athlete Tommie Smith won the 200 meter race in a world-record time of 19.83 seconds, with Australia’s Peter Norman second with a time of 20.06 seconds, and the U.S.’s John Carlos in third place with a time of 20.10 seconds. After the race was completed, the three went to collect their medals at the podium. The two U.S. athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue collar workers in the U.S. and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.” All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968 were inspired by Edwards’ arguments.
Both U.S. athletes intended on bringing black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his, leaving them in the Olympic Village. It was the Australian, Peter Norman, who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove, this being the reason behind him raising his left hand, as opposed to his right, differing from the traditional Black Power salute. When “The Star-Spangled Banner” played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd. Smith later said “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.”

If you are interested in the Black Power movement, The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 is a fascinating, powerful, and moving documentary. It’s available for instant streaming on Netflix. 

s-nn-mero:

On the morning of 16 October 1968, U.S. athlete Tommie Smith won the 200 meter race in a world-record time of 19.83 seconds, with Australia’s Peter Norman second with a time of 20.06 seconds, and the U.S.’s John Carlos in third place with a time of 20.10 seconds. After the race was completed, the three went to collect their medals at the podium. The two U.S. athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue collar workers in the U.S. and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.” All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968 were inspired by Edwards’ arguments.

Both U.S. athletes intended on bringing black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his, leaving them in the Olympic Village. It was the Australian, Peter Norman, who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove, this being the reason behind him raising his left hand, as opposed to his right, differing from the traditional Black Power salute. When “The Star-Spangled Banner” played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd. Smith later said “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.”

If you are interested in the Black Power movement, The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 is a fascinating, powerful, and moving documentary. It’s available for instant streaming on Netflix. 

— 1 year ago with 82 notes
#black power  #civil rights  #olympics  #sports 

mypantalones:

Fall digs from Britain-based Private White V.C.

(via gthegentleman)

— 1 year ago with 359 notes
#style  #menswear 

pourtrait:

“People who think that Sylvia Plath was a poor, sensitive poet are not getting that she had great amounts of ambition and anger that moved her along, or she wouldn’t have been able to fight against that depression to produce such an incredible body of work by the age of thirty.”

-Elizabeth Wurtzel

(Source: bycarmlau, via seaweeded-deactivated20120825)

— 1 year ago with 35 notes
#depression  #sylvia plath  #quote 
won-of-us:

HUF HAWAIIAN PRINT VOLLEY // BLACK BLOSSOM

Not usually into hats like this but this one is dope.

won-of-us:

HUF HAWAIIAN PRINT VOLLEY // BLACK BLOSSOM

Not usually into hats like this but this one is dope.

— 1 year ago with 2 notes
#hats  #menswear  #style